10 ways to go to the theater without leaving your house

In light of the Coronavirus pandemic, many people are wondering how they won't go stir crazy with the 14-day self-quarantine and small gatherings recommendations. As someone who goes to the theater at least twice a week, I know that the absence of that communal experience is going to be tough. In an effort to improve the silences and be a…

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Fake News and the art of doubt

I'll start this the way that most of these types of posts start. I normally don't write about politics, mostly because I don't want to add to the noise and I'd rather spread joy. But, also because having an outward political opinion and keeping a job usually don't go hand-in-hand, and today happens to Amazon Prime Day, so...yeah...(I needed those…

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A Tale of Two Conferences

I have been away from home more than I have been at home so far this month (I am not complaining), because I have attended two different journalism conferences. Both gave me different views on issues facing our field and our nation, and I have recapped my experiences below. EDUCATION WRITERS ASSOCIATION NATIONAL SEMINAR The first conference I attended was…

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Interview with “The Butler” author, Wil Haygood

I recently interviewed journalist/historian Wil Haygood in anticipation of his visit to the Atlanta History Center. He is best known for writing The Butler, and he has recently written a biography about Thurgood Marshall, the nation's first African American Supreme Court justice. Haygood was inspired to write about Marshall, because Marshall won Brown v. Board in 1954-- the same year…

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Reflections after attending the National Critics Institute

I spent the past two weeks at the O'Neill Theatre Center in New London, Conn. at the National Critics Institute-- the only writing workshop for early and mid-career theatre critics. In a cottage in New England I pondered about the state of theatre, the state of journalism, writing about people of color, how to incorporate dining content into theatre journalism,…

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Race Reads

Millennials are less tolerant than you think "The fact of the matter is that millennials who are white — that is, members of the group that has always had the most regressive racial beliefs, and who will constitute a majority of U.S. voters for at least another couple of decades — are, on key questions involving race, no more open-minded…

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